New Trump Immigration Order Could Save As Many as 600K U.S. Jobs

0

Much to the consternation of Republicans who have been wholly captured by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and Big Tech, President Donald Trump took massive action on Monday to put a moratorium on immigration visas. The president signed a new executive order that will significantly cut the guest-worker programs that keep foreign labor flowing into the country, including the H-1B visa program that has been solely responsible for filling American corporation ranks with non-American workers. The new restrictions, which are aimed at shoring up available jobs for American citizens in the wake of the coronavirus recession, will remain in effect until the end of 2020.

The order joins one Trump signed in April that restricted some forms of green card visas. The new one will expand those restrictions to H-1B tech workers visas, H-2B seasonal worker visas, and certain J and L category visas. Health care workers coming to the U.S. specifically to fight the COVID-19 pandemic will be exempt from the order, as will members of the U.S. military and those coming into the country on a H-2A agricultural visa.

“There are an unprecedented number of Americans who are out of work, but we are also expecting to see an unprecedented growth in our economy,” a senior administration official said Monday. “In order to ensure that we are hiring Americans first, we are putting a pause on certain non-immigrant visas into the United States, again for the purpose of ensuring that Americans can get jobs here in the U.S.”

To no one’s surprise, Silicon Valley was the first to register its displeasure with the new order.

“This proclamation undermines America’s greatest economic asset: its diversity. People from all over the world come here to join our labor force, pay taxes, and contribute to our global competitiveness on the world stage,” Twitter said in a tweet.

Monthly reminder that no one has ever proven that America’s greatest strength, economically or otherwise, is its diversity.

“As the economy rebounds, American businesses will need assurances that they can meet all their workforce needs,” complained Chamber of Commerce CEO Thomas Donahue. “To that end, it is crucial that they have access to talent both domestically and from around the world.”

Companies like Twitter and front groups like the Chamber of Commerce are still trying to convince the public that we have to open our doors to the “best and brightest” from near and far if America is to remain competitive. They want us to think that by limiting this kind of immigration, the U.S. is shooting itself in the foot, closing off access to brilliant scientists, unparalleled computer programming masters, and medical geniuses the world over.

Of course, the reality is much more prosaic. These foreign workers aren’t coming here to revolutionize the digital industry; they’re coming here to do grunt work for Apple, Microsoft, and Google so that these companies don’t have to pay American workers a fair wage. And at a time when there are unprecedented numbers of such workers sitting home, there’s just no excuse to keep letting these companies exploit India and China for the cheapest labor available.

Truth be told, there’s very little excuse for it even when there isn’t a pandemic messing up the economy.