The Case for President Donald Trump

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Donald Trump lent his voice to the South Carolina Tea Party Coalition Convention on Monday, giving a 30-minute keynote address that made allusions to a presidential run while stopping short of an official announcement. In his time on stage, he praised the Tea Party, took shots at the presumed 2016 GOP candidates, and proclaimed himself the best man for the Oval Office. Attendees who expect nothing less than that refreshing mixture of arrogance, candidness, and plain-spoken business acumen from Trump were doubtlessly pleased.

“I can get things done,” Trump said, noting that he was giving “serious thought” to making a bid for the White House. In the speech, he threw a couple of the presumed strongest GOP candidates under the bus. Speaking on Mitt Romney, Trump said, “For him to be running again is outrageous.” Turning his attention to the man many assume will run away with the nomination, he said, “The last thing this country needs is another Bush.”

Strong talk from a man who rarely trades in anything less, but is there any reason to think that Donald Trump has the slightest chance of becoming the president of the United States?

Perhaps.

First, let’s assume that a Trump campaign is a real possibility and not just another instance of the shrewd businessman drumming up publicity for himself. As the creator and star of NBC’s Celebrity Apprentice – currently on the air – Trump has every reason to use political teases to get his name in the papers. The more relevant the tycoon appears to the national conversation, the more people are likely to tune in to see him preside over the game-show board room.

But Trump is doing more than just making proclamations. According to a 2013 article in the New York Post, Trump spent more than a million dollars researching the electorate in preparation for a campaign. That indicates that the real-estate mogul may be interested in more than just some free press. So, giving him the benefit of the doubt, the question remains: is there any chance whatsoever that Donald Trump – a man seen as a sideshow clown to much of the country – could secure the Republican nomination?

The chances are certainly slim. But the road to victory is not an impossible one. Americans like big personalities, and Trump has one of the biggest. They also like success stories, and Trump has proven himself again and again in the business world. And despite conservatives coalescing around issues like immigration, healthcare, and guns, presidential elections are won and lost based on the economy. In times of peace – and this, with some reservation, is such a time – nothing matters more to the American people than the health and future of the private sector. And it is in that sector that Trump has shined.

Political strategists on both sides of the spectrum have labeled Trump as someone with nothing more than a big bank account and a big mouth, but this wouldn’t be the first time Trump has defied the odds.

Is a serious Trump candidacy probable? No way. Could it happen? American politics have seen stranger things.